Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute

Tulane University

"Revolutionary Cuba: Memory, Culture and Politics" - A Title VI-A UISFL Meeting

February 19th, 2010

Location
Tulane University
New Orleans, LA

Downloadable Registration Form
See below for full Registration Information.

The Title VI-A Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language (UISFL) Project Directors’ Meeting – “Revolutionary Cuba: Memory, Culture and Politics”

This symposium is co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Tulane University.

Note: This event is only open to Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language program grantees.

KEYNOTE ADDRESS
Ned Sublette: Musician, Author, Independent Scholar

Ned Sublette, who served as a Rockefeller Humanities Fellow at Tulane University and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies from 2004-2005, is the author of the recently published book The Year Before the Flood which chronicles Sublette’s experience of living in New Orleans during the year prior to Hurricane Katrina. He is also the author of The World that Made New Orleans: From Spanish Silver to Congo Square (2008). Sublette’s range of musical experience is unusually broad, ranging from original musicological field work in New Mexico, to conservatory study in classical guitar and composition, to aggressive loud-guitar bands, to cutting-edge Latin music. In 1990, he traveled to Cuba for the first time and was inspired to co-found Qbadisc, the first American record label dedicated to marketing contemporary Cuban music in the U.S. He was soon recognized as a major U.S. advocate for Cuban music, introducing American audiences to Cuban artists. His book on Cuban music, Cuba and Its Music: From the First Drums to the Mambo, was published in 2004.

PANEL DISCUSSION

“Architecture & the Revolution”
John Loomis: Architect

Loomis’ multidisciplinary career spans architecture, teaching, scholarship, and writing. He holds a B.A. with Distinction in Art History from Stanford University and a Master of Architecture degree from Columbia University. He is a licensed architect registered in New York where he lived and worked for fifteen years and was an associate professor of architecture at the City University of New York. His book, Revolution of Forms, Cuba ‘s Forgotten Art Schools, examines the convergence and collision of architecture, ideology, and culture in 1960s Cuba through the architectural design for the Escuelas Nacionales de Arte. This book prodded the Cuban government to commit to the preservation and restoration of these works of architecture, and has received an award from the World Monuments Fund. It is also the basis for the operatic work in progress by Charles Koppelman Revolution of Forms. John’s other activities involving Cuba have been chairing the 2002 ACSA International Conference “Architecture, Culture, and the Challenges of Globalization – Havana /La Habana” and as a member of the 2002 California State Business Delegation to Cuba. His honors and awards include a World Monuments Fund Certificate of Significant Accomplishment, Honors from the XII Bienal de Arquitectura de Ecuador, an NEA Award for Superior Design, and an AIA Education Award. He has been a Loeb Fellow at the Harvard Graduate School of Design and a Visiting Scholar at the Getty Research Institute.

Communication, Film & Politics
Ana López: Director of the Cuban & Caribbean Studies Institute, Senior Associate Provost, and Associate Professor of Communication, Tulane University

A long-standing faculty member of the Stone Center, Ana M. López became the director of the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute in Fall 2000. She is also an Associate Professor in the Communication Department and Associate Provost of the university. She holds both an M.A. in Communication and Theater Arts and a Ph.D. in Communication Studies from the University of Iowa. Her scholarship and publications are focused on Latin American film, media, television, and popular culture. She has also worked extensively with Latino cultural production in the U.S. Her work has been widely published in film and Latin American studies journals and she is the co-editor of the volumes Mediating Two Worlds (BFI, 1993), The Ethnic Eye: Latino Media Arts (University of Minnesota, 1996), and the three-volume Encyclopedia of Latin American Culture (Routledge, 2000). As director of the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute, she oversees the Summer in Cuba program, the Summer in the Dominican Republic program, and academic and cultural programming aimed at promoting a true Cuban and Caribbean presence on Tulane’s campus. López will be discussing the movie Coffea Arabiga (1968, Nicolás Guillén Landrián) and the history of both the “high point” of the Cuban documentary as well as its complex political valences.

Visual Imagery of the Revolution
Guadalupe García: Assistant Professor of History, Tulane University

Lupe García is a recent addition to the Department of History at Tulane, joining the faculty after spending two years as an assistant professor at the University of Central Florida. She received her M.A. in Latin American Studies from California State University and her Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. García specializes in late-colonial and early-modern Latin American history, with a particular focus on urban history, the Caribbean and Cuba. Her research interests include race and ethnicity in urban spaces, border identities in Latin America, and social revolution. García is currently working on her first book project tentatively entitled “Beyond the Walled City: Race and Exclusion in Colonial Havana.” The manuscript offers a comprehensive analysis of urbanization in colonial Havana and explores the ways in which racial ideologies and black colonial subjects shaped and reshaped the urban environment. She is also working on a collaborative book project on the visual iconography of revolutions.

EXHIBIT

Newcomb Gallery of Art
Polaridad Complementaria

Developed by the Centro de Arte Contemporáneo Wifredo Lam, Havana, Polaridad Complementaria offers audiences the opportunity to become acquainted with the island’s current and upcoming artistic talent. The more than 50 works of painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, video and installation art provide a sense of the serious aesthetic and conceptual concerns that characterizes Cuban art today. The 27 artists presented here are mainly young artists who have attained international recognition. The majority of these artists have taken part in fairs and biennials abroad and all have exhibited in Europe, Latin America and were featured in the 2009 Havana Biennial. Several have exhibited in the United States, including René Peña, Abel Barroso, Aimeé García, Yoan Capote and Roberto Fabelo.

Diverse in medium and ideology, the artists featured in Polaridad Complementaria understand the power of their art to address a wide range of social issues. Curator Margarita Sánchez pays particular attention to the works that illustrate the artists’ capacity to connect the local reality to global concerns and universal human issues. Often compared to American photographer Robert Mapplethorpe, René Peña explores the relationship between individuals within society and the struggle for their own identity. Abel Barroso carves three-dimensional pieces using wood and various printing methods to create a conversation about technology and the third-world. From Zulueta, Cuba, Duvier del Dago takes it one step further combining drawing with handmade 3D design examining the unattainable, whether it be the material or the ideal. Other artists include Juan Carlos Alom, Lidzie Alvisa, Luis Enrique Camejo, Ricard Elías, Adonis Flores, Aimée García, Glenda León, Douglas Pérez, Sandra Ramos, Fernando Rodríguez, Ángel Ramírez, René Francisco Rodríguez Olazábal, Lázaro Saavedra, Ludmila Velasco, Nelson Arellano, and Reinerio Tamayo. From simplistic to intricately fabricated, these artists create a narrative of Cuba today.

UISFL

For more information visit the website of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Postsecondary Education’s International Education Programs Service.

Registration Information
Note: Pre-Registration runs through January 22, 2010. After the 22nd, full registration fees are required for attendance.

There are several ways in which to register for the Project Directors’ Meeting.

To pay by credit card:

  • Online Registration – Click the “Register Online” button at the top or bottom of this page and fill in the required information to submit your application directly to the Stone Center.
  • Email Registration – Download the “Downloadable Registration Form” from the top or bottom of this page and fill in and save the required information and email the completed form to rtsclas@tulane.edu.
  • Registration by Mail – Download the “Downloadable Registration Form” from the top or bottom of this page and fill in the required information and mail your registration form with credit card information to the address below.

To pay by check:

  • Online Registration – Click the “Register Online” button at the top or bottom of this page and fill in the required information (with the exception of credit card information) to submit your application directly to the Stone Center. Mail your check separately.
  • Email Registration – Download the “Downloadable Registration Form” from the top or bottom of this page and fill in and save the required information (with the exception of credit card information) and email the completed form to rtsclas@tulane.edu. Mail your check separately.
  • Registration by Mail – Download the “Downloadable Registration Form” from the top or bottom of this page and fill in the required information (with the exception of credit card information) and mail the completed form and the check.

All mail (checks and/or registration forms, depending on your chosen form of registration) should be sent to:

Stone Center for Latin American Studies
Attn: Title VIA Project Directors’ Meeting
Tulane University
100 Jones Hall
New Orleans, LA 70118

Downloadable Registration Form

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Stone Center for Latin American Studies to host 11th annual Workshop on Field Research Methods

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Join us at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies for the 11th Annual Weekend Workshop on Field Research Methods on Saturday, January 26, 2019. The deadline to apply for the workshop is January 15, 2019.

How will you get the data you need for your thesis or dissertation? Do you envision immersing yourself for months in the local culture, or tromping the hills and farms seeking respondents? Sorting through dusty archives? Observing musicians at work in the plaza? Downloading and crunching numbers on a computer? For any of these approaches: How might you get there, from here?

This workshop aims to help you approach your data collection and analysis for your thesis or dissertation topic, and to adapt and refine your topic to be more feasible. You will take your research project ideas to the next stop—whatever that may be, include raising travel grants. Learn to:

  • Plan more efficiently, feasible, and rewarding fieldwork
  • Prepare more compelling and persuasive grant proposals
  • Navigate choices of research methods and course offerings on campus
  • Become a better research and fieldwork team-member

Format
This is an engaged, hands-on, informal workshop. Everyone shares ideas and participates. We will explore and compare research approaches, share experiences and brainstorm alternatives. You will be encouraged to think differently about your topic, questions, and study sites as well as language preparation, budgets, and logistics. The participatory format is intended to spark constructive new thinking, strategies, and student networks to continue learning about (and conducting) field research.

Who is leading this?
Laura Murphy, PhD, faculty in Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences, and affiliate faculty to the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

Who is this for?
This workshop is targeted to Stone Center graduate students as well as graduate students from other programs (GOHB, CCC, humanities, sciences, and others) if space is available. The workshop will be particularly helpful for those who envision research with human subjects.

Sign up
Sign up as soon as you can! Apply by January 15, 2019, at the latest to confirm your stop. Send an email with the following details:

  • Your name
  • Department and Degree program
  • Year at Tulane
  • Prior experience in research, especially field research
  • Academic training in research design and methods
  • Include a 1-paragraph statement of your current research interests and immediate plans/needs (i.e. organize summer field research)

Light breakfast and lunch will be provided. Not for credit.

For more information and/or to apply: Contact Laura Murphy or Jimmy Huck.

In the Shadows of Slavery and Colonialism: A Symposium on Intersectionality and the Law

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The Tulane and New Orleans communities are invited to join the Newcomb College Institute (NCI) for a day-long symposium In the Shadows of Slavery and Colonialism: A Symposium on Intersectionality and the Law, which provides an opportunity for researchers affiliated with NCI to engage with distinguished scholars in their field around the legal and political legacies of slavery and colonialism through an intersectional lens.

The researchers for the 2019 symposium are scholars who have been NCI postdoctoral fellows in the past two years. The Symposium theme was selected based on shared issues in the work of these researchers. They are Dr. Bonnie Lucero of the University of Houston and Dr. Emma Shakeshaft of the ACLU of Wisconsin, both of whom were Law & Society Fellows at NCI from 2017-2018, and Dr. Maria R. Montalvo, NCI’s 2018-2019 Bonquois Fellow in Women’s History in the Gulf South.

NCI has been awarded a Carol Lavin Bernick Faculty Grant from Tulane to host this inaugural symposium with the hope and intention that it will become a biennial event. In 2016 the Carol Lavin Bernick Family Foundation initiated this unique grant program to support the research and teaching of Tulane faculty.

This year’s symposium will consist of three sessions, each of which includes a discussion between one NCI researcher, her chosen distinguished scholar, and the audience. The researchers will prepare papers in advance for these sessions. (RSVP below to receive copies of pre-circulated materials.)

The symposium will also include a Fridays at Newcomb lunchtime panel with all three invited scholars. The panel will be moderated by Tulane Professor Laura Rosanne Adderley and will explore the usefulness of intersectionality as a theoretical framework for revealing the legacies of slavery and colonialism. Fridays at Newcomb is a lecture series with speakers across disciplines that provides students with the opportunity to learn about subjects outside of their majors. Lunch is provided at every Fridays at Newcomb lecture and they are each free and open to the public.

The schedule will be as follows:

8:30 – 8:45 AM – Tulane President Michael Fitts has been invited to give opening remarks

8:45 – 10:00 AM – Bonnie Lucero and Deirdre Cooper Owens, a conversation about Dr. Lucero’s paper, “Reproducing Racial Hierarchy in Cuba’s Slave Society.” RSVP recommended.

10:15 – 11:30 AM – Emma Shakeshaft and Dorothy Roberts, a conversation about Dr. Shakeshaft’s paper, Race, Membership, and Sovereignty: the Benefits of Using a Comparative Approach When Analyzing Race in Transracial Adoption Cases. RSVP recommended.

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM – Fridays at Newcomb, In the Shadows of Slavery and Colonialism: The Uses of Intersectionality, Dorothy Roberts, Marisa Fuentes, and Deirdre Cooper Owens, moderated by Laura Rosanne Adderley, Associate Professor of History and Director of Africana Studies at Tulane University

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM – Maria R. Montalvo and Marisa J. Fuentes, a conversation about Dr. Montalvo’s paper, The Burden of Proof: Race, Freedom, and Litigation in the 1800s. RSVP recommended.

RSVP Information

In order to ensure the highest quality of engagement with each scholar’s work, NCI will collect RSVPs and will make the research essays available in advance to those who plan to attend the symposium sessions. Note that no RSVP is necessary for attendance at the Fridays at Newcomb lunchtime panel.

RSVP HERE

City, Community, and Culture Symposium VOICES

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The City, Culture, and Community (CCC) program at Tulane University is now accepting submissions for the 2019 spring symposium to be held on February 9, 2019. The deadline to submit a proposal is December 21, 2018. The 2019 symposium, VOICES: Visibility, Orientation, Identity, Creativity, Environment, Spaces, seeks to understand creative approaches to how inequalities are negotiated: socially, culturally, and institutionally.

The symposium is looking for research that explores creative approaches to agency, institutional organization, and cultural production and consumption within complex social systems. What are the current issues facing our communities, institutions, and cities? How can we be creative and inclusive in our approach? We are interested in how scholars frame these questions in regards to race, gender, sexuality, and class. This symposium invites scholars to present work from a variety of disciplines, perspectives, theoretical frameworks, and methodologies. As the academy continues to evolve, interdisciplinarity proves more and more a necessity. This symposium intends to create an interdisciplinary space that can bring together scholars, practitioners, students, and community members to engage across lines and extend current conversations around agency, resilience, and social justice across the globe.

The keynote speaker, Dr. Ernesto Martinez, is an Associate Professor in Ethnic Studies at the University of Oregon. In his keynote address Queer Arousals in Contexts of Racialized Harm, Dr. Martinez conducts an intersectional analysis of the ways that queer men of color negotiate epistemic injustice through the creation and consumption of film, literature, and art. His research interests include queer ethnic studies, women of color feminisms, US Latinx literature and culture, and literary theory. He is the author of On Making Sense: Queer Race Narratives of Intelligibility (Stanford UP, 2012) and The Truly Diverse Faculty: New Dialogues in American Higher Education. (Palgrave, 2014). Along with his academic achievements, Dr. Martinez also writes bilingual Latinx children’s books, produces films (La Sarentata, 2017), and serves as a board member for the Association for Jotería Arts, Activism, and Scholarship (AJAAS), a queer Latinx grassroots organization dedicated to producing art and analyzing culture and politics in the context of activism.

Conference submissions are open to graduate students, outstanding undergraduates, educators, and practitioners. The symposium is a forum to showcase original research, theory expansion, innovative analysis, practical applications, and case studies. We welcome unpublished journal articles, area exam sections, dissertation chapters, working papers, and other forms of research analysis. As the space is intended to be for workshopping and dialoguing, literature reviews will not be considered. Presentations will be organized either in panels or individually.

The submission deadline is December 21, 2018. Any questions should be directed to tulaneccc@gmail.com.

Teaching Cuban Culture & Society: A K-12 Summer Educator Institute in Cuba

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APPLICATION DEADLINE: MARCH 8, 2019
Cost: $3300

Now, in its fifth year, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute at Tulane University are proud to announce the return of our annual two-week summer educator institute exploring the geography, culture and history of Cuba. For an educator, Cuba is rich with lessons to bring into the classroom. This program highlights the important historical and cultural connections between the United States and Cuba. Participants will explore key sites and meet local experts and artists who will provide unique insight for educators who teach such subjects as U.S./Latin American Relations, World Geography, World History, and Spanish among others. Come and visit the site of the historic Bay of Pigs, explore Milton Hershey’s sugar plantation and hear firsthand about the Cuban national literacy campaign from the teachers themselves. In collaboration with The Hershey Story, The Museum on Chocolate Avenue.

Fill out the online APPLICATION here, due March 8, 2019. In addition, supplemental materials are also needed by March 8th in order for application to be considered complete.

Applicants also have the option to fill out and submit an Adobe PDF version of the APPLICATION. Please submit this application and the supplemental materials via email to crcrts@tulane.edu by March 8th, 2019.

Additional materials needed:

  • Two letters of recommendation (please make sure to have at least one recommendation letter from a colleague at your school) Please email your recommenders the PDF above. They submit via email the complete recommendation letter.
  • Copy of Passport
  • Sample lesson plan
  • $500 program deposit

THE PROGRAM INCLUDES:

  • Lodging at Casa Vera (double occupancy)
  • At least 1 meal a day (at Casa Vera and on excursions)
  • Transportation to/from airport to residence (if you arrive on time)
  • Medical insurance: Each participant will be covered for the entire program length by a travel health insurance policy.
  • Group tours and excursions, with associated transportation

THE PROGRAM DOES NOT INCLUDE:

  • Airfare to/from Miami: approx. $300-$600
  • Visa: $50-$100 depending on airline
  • Checked luggage ($25) + Overweight baggage: This constitutes anything in excess of maximum allowed luggage weight (50lbs), both going and returning from Cuba.
  • Communication: Internet and long distance/international calls
  • Additional meals (1 a day, snacks)
  • Taxi/ground transportation: Participants are responsible for expenses incurred getting around town during free time.
  • Admission to museums, events, etc.: Participants will be responsible for these expenses unless they are part of itinerary.
  • All materials and personal expenditures
  • Loss/Theft Travel Insurance: Please note only travel medical insurance is included in program. If you would like additional coverage (including insurance for loss of baggage, emergency cash transfers, etc.), it is recommended that you purchase additional insurance.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: MARCH 8, 2019

Please email crcrts@tulane.edu or call 504.865.5164 for additional details.