Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute

Tulane University

Guadalupe García

Assistant Professor - History

Contact Info
ggarcia4@tulane.edu

Department Affiliation
History

Biography

Guadalupe García specializes in the history of cities and colonialism in Latin America and the Caribbean. Her research examines the intersections of colonialism, empire, and urban space and focuses on free, black, and enslaved peoples in Havana. Her work has appeared in the Journal of Latin American Studies and Cultural Studies. García’s fellowships and awards include a Distinguished Fellowship at the CUNY Grad Center’s Advanced Research Collaborative and research and digital fellowships at the John Carter Brown Library in Providence, Rhode Island. She has also held a Transatlantic Research Fellowship at the University of Warwick in the UK. Professor García is currently at work on a second book project that explores the use of digital humanities to interrogate how space, scale, and mapping can be used to counter the logic of the archive and expand our contemporary understanding of urban areas.

Guadalupe García’s first book, Beyond the Walled City: Colonial Exclusion in Havana‘€¯(University of California Press, 2016) is based on archival research in Cuban, North American, and Spanish archival collections. Beyond the Walled City begins with the founding of the city in the early sixteenth century and extends through the end of the U.S. military occupation in 1902. It explores the relationship between city space and Spanish colonial rule in Cuba. Among its contributions, the book illustrates urban-based patterns of imperial rule and argues that colonialism in the Caribbean (and neocolonialism beyond it) was not simply concentrated in the institutions, disciplines, and discourses of the Spanish empire.

Professor García’s current book, Black Urban Space and Colonial Logic in Nineteenth Century Havana, returns to García’s interests in the nineteenth-century city. This project is part research endeavor and part methodological exercise‘€“it explores the role of digital technologies to examine the multiple, layered geographies of the nineteenth-century city. Black Urban Space visually narrates a history of the city through the lens of space, freedom, slavery, and economic and cultural exchange while focusing on the meanings created by a legal urban body. One of its goals is to map the spaces in which black colonial subjects moved and reorient the visual image of the city (in this case Havana), making visible the ways in which port cities across the Atlantic facilitated black, Caribbean, and creole mobility. This is a born-digital project with a print component that will allow access to the work outside of the academic community.

García’s current research brings into sharp relief the importance of methodological innovation and collaborate work. She has also co-authored articles with Dr. Lisa B.Y. Calvente, a black diaspora and performance scholar, that employ visual ethnographic methods and archival work to explore theories of urban space. In two of these projects, The City Speaks (published by Cultural Studies) and “A Haunting Presence: Black Absence and Racilaized Mappings in Colonial and Contemporary Louisiana” (article under review), García and Calvente pursue historical inquiry that troubles the disciplinary boundaries of the field as well as western notions of archival knowledge that privilege text and materiality.

Degrees
  • B.A., Pitzer College, Political Studies and Literature, 1997
  • M.A., California State University, Latin American Studies, 2001
  • Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, HIstory, 2006
Academic Experience
  • Associate Professor, Tulane University, 2016-
  • Assistant Professor, Tulane University, 2009-2015
  • Assistant Professor, University of Central Florida, 2006-2008
  • Teaching Assistant, UNC Chapel Hill, 2001-2006

Research & Teaching Specializations: 19th and 20th century Latin America, Urban Studies, Race and Ethnicity, Caribbean, Cuba

Related Experience
  • Associate Editor, Hispanic American Historical Review, (HAHR), 2017
  • James R Scobie Memorial Award Committee, Conference on latin American History (CLAH), American Historical Association (AHA), 2015 Manuscript Reviewer, Academic Presses and Journals, 2012-2016
Distinctions
  • John Carter Brown Library Fellowship, Short-Term, Brown University, 2016
  • Excellence in Graduate Teaching Award, Latin American Studies, Tulane University, 2015
  • Warwick Transatlantic Fellowship, University of Warwick, UK, 2013-2014
  • Honorable Mention, Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, 2013
  • Finalist, Award to Louisiana Scholars and Artists (ATLAS), Board of Regents, 2013
  • Young Glick Fellow, School of Liberal Arts, Tulane University, 2013
  • Lurcy Research Grant, School of Liberal Arts, Tulane University, 2013
  • Latin American Studies Center Library Research Grant, University of Florida, 2006
  • Mellon Foundation Fellowship, 2005
  • Ford Foundation Diversity Dissertation Fellowship, 2005
  • Mowry Summer Research Grant, UNC Chapel Hill, 2003
  • Waddell Memorial Fellowship, UNC Chapel Hill, 2001
Languages
  • Spanish
  • French
Overseas Experience
  • Cuba
  • Spain
  • Mexico
Selected Publications
  • Forthcoming. “A Haunting Presence: Black Absence and Racilaized Mappings in Colonial and Contemporary Louisiana,” Cultural Studies.
  • 2016. Beyond the Walled City: Colonial Exclusion in Havana. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • 2016. Imprints of Revolution: Visual Representations of Resistance. With Lisa B.Y. Calvente. London: Rowman & Littlefield International.
  • 2015. “‘La ciudad antigua y la ciudad nueva:’ Topographies of Displacement in Nineteenth-Century Havana.” Revista Quiroga, Revisa de patrimonio Iberoamericano, 7: 22-30.
  • 2014. “The City Speaks: Dis/Articulating Revolutionary Havana, Cuba, and Global Belonging.” Cultural Studies 28(3): 438-462.
  • 2011. “Urban Guajiros: Colonial Reconcentración, Rural Displacement, and Criminalization in Western Cuba, 1895-1902.” Journal of Latin American Studies 43, 2, 209-235.
  • 2011. “Nuestra patria La Habana: Reading the 1762 British Occupation of the City.” Nuevo Mundo/Mundos Nuevos, “Debates.” Online Journal, URL
  • 2005. “Aurora Castillo.” In Notable American Women: A Biographical Dictionary, Completing the Twentieth Century. Susan Ware, ed. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. 5: 107-108.
  • 2005. “Carnival.” In Encyclopedia Latina: History, Culture, and Society in the United States. Ilan Stavans and Harold Augenbraum, eds. Danbury, CT: Grolier, Inc.
  • 2005. “Mexican American Unity Council.” In Encyclopedia Latina: History, Culture, and Society in the United States. Ilan Stavans and Harold Augenbraum, eds. Danbury, CT: Grolier, Inc.

Recently-Taught Latin American-Related Courses: HISL1710: Introduction to Latin American History, HISL-2910-01: Cuba, Revolution and Cold War

Number of Dissertations or Theses Supervised in the Past 5 Years: 3

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Upcoming Events

Lunch with LAGO featuring Ruben Luciano

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Join the Latin Americanist Graduate Organization (LAGO) on Friday, 1/24 at 12pm for the latest installment of our bi-weekly lunch series. Ruben Luciano is a Ph.D. student in the Tulane University History department, specializing in modern Latin American (specifically, Dominican) history, the military under dictatorship, intersectionality, and gender. He also has two Master’s degrees in the Social Sciences and Health Communication. He’ll be speaking on his thesis project, entitled “Queering the Trujillato: Reinterpretations of Loyalty, Criminality, and Homosociality in the Dominican Military from 1930-61.” Afterwards, we’ll open the floor for a Q & A, allowing for further conversation about Ruben’s work, more practical questions about the dissertation research and writing experience, and navigating the grants application process as a Ph.D. student.

The Labyrinth will be serving mini paninis, bagels, savory spreads and dips, desserts (including tres leches cake) and fresh juices. Please come hungry!

Haitian Artists Showcase at Tulane

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HAITIANOLA and the Stone Center present artists from the Jacmel Arts Center in Jacmel, Haiti. This event will feature live dance as well as a discussion on Haitian art and its connection to New Orleans culture.

FLAS Summer Fellowship Application Deadline: February 14th, 2020

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies receives funding from the U.S. Department of Education’s Title VI program for Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowships. FLAS fellowships administered by the Stone Center are available to undergraduate and graduate students for the intensive study over the summer of Kaqchikel Maya, Portuguese, or another less-commonly taught Latin American language. Graduate students wishing to engage in intensive study of such a language are encouraged to apply for one of these fellowships. Only U.S. citizens or permanent residents are eligible to apply; and only intensive summer language programs that meet the FLAS guidelines will be considered. A listing of some of the approved programs is prepared by CLASP and available on-line. Program information and application packets for Tulane sponsored summer language programs can be found here.

The following FAQs offer further information on the application process and program guidelines for undergraduates and graduates respectively:

Summer FLAS FAQ for Undergraduates
Summer FLAS FAQ for Graduate Students

The Stone Center staff held an on-line information session on Wednesday, January 15, 2020. You can access the video and PowerPoint presentation here: FLAS SUMMER APPLICATION MATERIALS for 2020 All materials are PDF files, forms are in fillable PDF format.

All application materials, including the faculty recommendation form, proposal narrative, and financial need statement or FAFSA EFC, should be submitted electronically by email according to the application guidelines. Please review these guidelines carefully.

For questions regarding the FLAS Fellowship, please contact Dr. Jimmy Huck by email at jhuck@tulane.edu OR Valerie McGinley at vmcgmar@tulane.edu.

Graduate Student Writing Group

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The Graduate Student Writing Group convenes on Fridays from 1:30 – 3:30 PM. These structured writing sessions are open to Latin Americanist graduate students in all departments. Students, who arrive with a project and a goal, work in communal silence during two 45 minute blocks separated by a 10-minute coffee break. All meetings will be held in the Latin American Library Seminar Room. Co-sponsored by the Stone Center and the Latin American Library.

Teaching Cuban Culture & Society: A K-12 Summer Educator Institute in Cuba

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APPLICATION DEADLINE: MARCH 15, 2020
Cost: $3580

Now, in its fifth year, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute at Tulane University are proud to announce the return of our annual two-week summer educator institute exploring the geography, culture and history of Cuba. For an educator, Cuba is rich with lessons to bring into the classroom. This program highlights the important historical and cultural connections between the United States and Cuba. Participants will explore key sites and meet local experts and artists who will provide unique insight for educators who teach such subjects as U.S./Latin American Relations, World Geography, World History, and Spanish among others. Come and visit the site of the historic Bay of Pigs, explore Milton Hershey’s sugar plantation and the Cuban national literacy campaign.

Fill out the online APPLICATION here, due March 15, 2020.

Additional materials needed:
  • Two letters of recommendation (please make sure to have at least one recommendation letter from a colleague at your school) Please email your recommenders the PDF above. They submit via email the complete recommendation letter.
  • Copy of Passport
  • $200 program deposit

THE PROGRAM INCLUDES:

  • Lodging at Casa Vera (double occupancy)
  • At least 1 meal a day (at Casa Vera and on excursions)
  • Transportation to/from airport to residence (if you arrive on time)
  • Medical insurance: Each participant will be covered for the entire program length by a travel health insurance policy.
  • Group tours and excursions, with associated transportation

THE PROGRAM DOES NOT INCLUDE:

  • Airfare to/from the U.S.: approx. $300-$600
  • Visa: $50-$100 depending on airline
  • Checked luggage ($25) + Overweight baggage: This constitutes anything in excess of maximum allowed luggage weight (50lbs), both going and returning from Cuba.
  • Communication: Internet and long distance/international calls
  • Additional meals (1 a day, snacks)
  • Taxi/ground transportation: Participants are responsible for expenses incurred getting around town during free time.
  • Admission to museums, events, etc.: Participants will be responsible for these expenses unless they are part of itinerary.
  • All materials and personal expenditures
  • Loss/Theft Travel Insurance: Please note only travel medical insurance is included in program. If you would like additional coverage (including insurance for loss of baggage, emergency cash transfers, etc.), it is recommended that you purchase additional insurance.

APPLICATION

Please email crcrts@tulane.edu or call 504.865.5164 for additional details.

Preview the Itinerary here